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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
05 Tiburon GT, AT, 70k
Just started having starting issues.
Sometimes starts fine and other times doesnt and ends up flooded, maybe if lucky 20 min later she will start.
Sometimes out of the blue she stalls usually at a most inopportune time.
Was throwing a TPS code.
Replaced TPS and Idle Air Control Valve
Replaced plugs and wires.
Upon replacing the TPS, code goes away for a short bit but returns.
No obvious vacuum leaks.
Wiring to these connectors seems ok.
Dont want to take to the dealer..
TIA for any ideas.
D
 

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2006 Hyundai Tiburon SE
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But did you buy OEM sensors and IACV? These cars are so finicky about sensors you can't buy junk from local parts stores. Try again with real OEM parts and reset your ECU adaptive values by unplugging the battery for a short time.

Specifically which TPS code are you receiving? There are half a dozen TPS CELS that all mean different things.

Crank no start or sometimes starts and "floods" indicates you aren't getting spark or intermittently getting spark. How are you determining whether the engine is flooded? Raw gas smell from exhaust? I'm willing to bet your crank angle sensor is the culprit. If the ECU isn't getting a clean crank signal it will not fire your coils. Sometimes this is affected by temperature so a cold start works but a few seconds or minutes later the signal breaks up. Most of the time a failing crank position sensor won't trigger a CEL.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Chase, thanks for your quick response.
It's my son's car ..
Just went out to check code and for some reason, the code reader is not there...
Value too high I seem to remember.
The TPS, first tryed a non Hyundai part, once realized problem still with us, got an original Hyundai part.
The IACV is not a Hyundai part.

I just ordered a Hyundai Crank Position Sensor.

Haven't reset the ECU yet.. will do that in the am...
 

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2006 Hyundai Tiburon SE
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The IACV won't have Hyundai stamped on it. But the OEM IACV's are "HMC" and "KEFICO" branded. Like this:

Camera accessory Material property Gas Cameras & optics Font


The TPS circuit too high might indicate a short between the 5v feed and the sensor return. I would recommend disconnecting the TPS and measuring resistance between each of the 3 pins on the harness. You should see near infinite or really high resistance between the 5v feed and the sensor return. The only true way to test if that is shorted you will need to disconnect the harness from the ECU but that's a difficult task accessing the ECU. The internal resistance of the ECU might be in the 10k ohm or higher range. Then the ground wire should show 0 resistance to the chassis. I couldn't tell you which wire is which, but it will be pretty obvious which is ground when you test resistance to the chassis leaving you only the two others to test for a short.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The IACV won't have Hyundai stamped on it. But the OEM IACV's are "HMC" and "KEFICO" branded. Like this:

View attachment 138266

The TPS circuit too high might indicate a short between the 5v feed and the sensor return. I would recommend disconnecting the TPS and measuring resistance between each of the 3 pins on the harness. You should see near infinite or really high resistance between the 5v feed and the sensor return. The only true way to test if that is shorted you will need to disconnect the harness from the ECU but that's a difficult task accessing the ECU. The internal resistance of the ECU might be in the 10k ohm or higher range. Then the ground wire should show 0 resistance to the chassis. I couldn't tell you which wire is which, but it will be pretty obvious which is ground when you test resistance to the chassis leaving you only the two others to test for a short.
Thanks Chase!
Sooo, sons car has not changed.
Had a small exhaust leak and I repaired this and drove the tibby for about 20 miles, stopping and restarting several times.
She finally gave up on me and wouldn't start, flooded...
After 45 min, she did start but as soon as I put in gear she died 😞
After the oem crankshaft position sensor was put in, he thought for a drive cycle that problems were gone until she threw the following codes:
============1==============
P0455
Raw code: 0455
ECU: 11
Status: Test is inhibited by other DTC, Test has not been completed, Validated and stored in non volatile memory, Validated fault present at time of request, Validated fault has been present during this drive cycle
OBDII: Evaporative emission (EVAP) system - large leak detected

============2==============
P0340
Raw code: 0340
ECU: 11
Status: Test conditions are met, Validated and stored in non volatile memory
OBDII: Camshaft position (CMP) sensor A, bank 1 - circuit malfunction

============3==============
P0455
Raw code: 0455
ECU: 11
Status: Pending
OBDII: Evaporative emission (EVAP) system - large leak detected

============4==============
U1300
Raw code: D300
ECU: 18
Status: Pending

============5==============
P1843
Raw code: 1843
ECU: 18
Status: Pending
OBDII: Transmission Transfer Case Differential Lock-Up Feedback Switch Open Circuit

============6==============
B07F1
Raw code: 87F1
ECU: 18
Status: Pending

ARGGG....Dave
 

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2006 Hyundai Tiburon SE
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After the car runs and drives a while, what do your long term fuel trims look like? Are you seeing positive or negative long term fuel trims? This could help diagnose the issue with your EVAP system.

Here are my thoughts on your CELs:

P0455:
The EVAP system is basically a hose with a couple valves and a charcoal cannister between your gas tank and the throttle body to vent vapors to the engine instead of to atmosphere. I'm not sure how it can detect a large leak, but you should trace all the hoses from the tank to the throttle body to see if there is a significant vacuum leak anywhere. If there is a vacuum leak when the EVAP purge valve opens your car will go extremely lean at that time. Otherwise, if there is no leak... but some of the charcoal pellets from the cannister are stuck in the EVAP purge valve, you may be extremely rich because you are sucking in raw fuel or fuel vapor from the EVAP system unregulated by the purge valve. Drive the car a little while at highway speed if it will drive at all, and check your LTFT to see how far positive or negative it goes. Generally -10 to +10 is acceptable. Anything approaching -20 or +20 is showing signs of a problem.

P0340:
Basically it could be a sensor or it could be the wiring leading to the camshaft sensor. Try replacing the sensor and if the problem persists, trace back the wiring to the ECU and look for any damage to the wiring or connector.

U1300:
"Low Voltage On Class 2 Serial Data Circuit" is a new one to me. May be a connectivity problem between the ECU, BCM, TCM or gauge cluster. There is a "serial data circuit" but I believe that's the CANBUS which where these components communicate over. I see Uxxx codes occasionally that turn out to be nothing most of the time.

P1843:
First time seeing this on newtib. General idea is that this is a short or open circuit on a harness to the transmission. Your description of it doesn't match the Hyundai description I just looked up. Might be a harness problem. Again inspect the harness and connectors for any damage.

B07F1:
I can't find any information on this code. Can't comment on it.
 

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EVAP leaks can be "fun". Large leak, I would start with making sure the gas cap is fully snugged in.
As to testing the EVAP system, it may be a pressure test or a vacuum test. From a known starting point, how fast does the pressure change, thus tripping a CEL.
Very slowly, means a small leak. Hose, connection, partially clogged valve, etc.
Very fast, means a big leak. Gas cap/gas cap seal (check the O-ring on the cap, look at the metal filler port for rust or nicks. Grease on the seal may help), bad hose, fully failed or clogged valve (usually the valve by the charcoal canister behind right rear wheel).
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Update:
Tibbie went to dealer.
They found camshaft sensor with all its wiring disintegrated. They replaced the camshaft sensor and had us come get the car. All seemed good for a short period until BAM, stalled, flooded and wont restart 😞
No codes thrown.
Last time she stalled, took 4 hours till she would start again.
 

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A very common problem is a faulty crank angle sensor. Often times it gets worse when the engine warms up or reaches closed loop. Letting the engine cool down and being able to start it is a sign of this as well. When the crank angle signal is lost, the ignition system will be interrupted. It doesn't usually throw a check engine light because no signal means tells the ECU that the engine is off.

Buy only OEM sensors such as Siemens, NTK or Mando crank angle sensors. If you have aftermarket headers, make sure you wrap your crank angle sensor with a heat protective sleeve. Headers generate so much heat that it will kill your crank angle sensor quickly.
 
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