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Discussion Starter #1
ive read serveral posts on our cam gears and sprokets(sorry if spelled wrong). The information I'm trying to find is degreeing the cams correctly and doing the seperation by 1 on each cam, which is supposly good for NA setups. Anyone have any tips on finding usable cam sprokets?
 

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TBH I don't even know if there are any that are made for the Tib anymore. Used to NGM used to have some for sale. I believe Fidanza made some for a while as well. Aside from that I can't think of anyone else.
 

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Yeah basically, besides being lighter there's not going to be a lot of usefulness without sprockets as well.

I'm sure there's a sproket from other makes/models that we can use, just haven't found it yet. Everything I've seen seems to use a bigger sprocket than we do.
 

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Ideally, for a Tib (at least the V6) is 2 cam gears (that the timing belt runs on) and 2 cam sprockets (that connect a cam in the head to the other cam in the head).
Then, you could adjust cam timing on each cam by itself.

If you only get gears or sprockets, whatever cam timing change you do in a head will change BOTH cams in the head as they are connected by a chain.

In most Subaru engines, each cam has it's own gear, so it "can" be easier to change timing except that nobody really makes adjustable gears for most Subaru engines.

For the Tib, "maybe" the best bet would be to talk to a cam vendor and ask about getting a grind done with the timing a little different, but then it's not adjustable.

For most basically stock/slightly modified engines, cam timing/indexing doesn't gain much if the cam is correct.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
With a adjustable cam gear doesn't that change the seperation of the loafs of the cams. So advancing the timing would open the intake valves longer in timing of the piston. Then using a dial indicator you can make the adjustments of the cams with the cam gear. Why would you need to change the sprokets when the cam gear itself retards or advances the timing?
 

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As Charlie said, unless you have both the cam gear AND sprocket, you're advancing and regarding the whole cam system. You have to have both in order to adjust overlap. To change duration, you need new cams or a cam regrind.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
So on one side one cam gear advances both intake and exhaust cam shafts. While what we want is intake advance and exhaust retard. But we can't do that in our cars because of the sprokets not being adjustable. What size of sproket would we need for that to work?
 

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So on one side one cam gear advances both intake and exhaust cam shafts. While what we want is intake advance and exhaust retard. But we can't do that in our cars because of the sprokets not being adjustable. What size of sprocket would we need for that to work?
Correct, both cams have sprockets so a chain between them keeps the cam timing constant between those 2 cams.
Then, one of the cams ALSO has the timing belt gear/pulley which is what determines the cam timing to the crank (and thus, pistons).

Adjustable gears and/or sprockets can adjust cam timing relative to the crank/pistons, duration of valve movement is ONLY by the cam grind.

PS, I'm leaving out hybrid valve actuation such as electromechanical/pneumatic systems.

PPS, I have no clue on what sort of adjustable sprocket you would need. As I stated before, most "fairly stock" engines don't NEED to be able to adjust cam timing/indexing. The slight gain is not worth the price or time.
 
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