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I loaned my Tiburon to a friend, she got a few miles down the road and the car quit. It starts but runs so horribly it sounds like it's going to blow up. No lights are on and it shows no codes like everything is fine. First thought is the position sensors, then maybe that it jumped time. But since it has no codes I'm thinking ECU. I know alot about cars but I'm not a mechanic by no means, so I need some help here please.
 

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It starts but runs so horribly it sounds like it's going to blow up. First thought is the position sensors, maybe that it jumped time. But since it has no codes I'm thinking ECU.
Not much info to go by.

What year and engine type is your Tib? How many miles in total? Are you using OEM oil filters or parts store garbage like FRAM or Microguard? When was the last time the timing belt was replaced? What brand was the timing kit and did it include the timing tensioner and timing pulleys/bearings too? Peel back the timing covers and check all your timing marks. If everything is in time, run the engine and take a video of the noise it makes. If it's terminal, the damage was already done so it won't hurt it any more to run it for a few minutes for a video.

I strongly doubt the ECM quit on you unless it had water on it from a leak by the passenger side footwell. However, the ECM does do some weird stuff if a sensor is reporting an incorrect signal even though you don't have a CEL to go by. The onboard diagnostics can't always detect a problem especially if a sensor is incorrectly reporting data but still within normal operating voltage range. Incorrect fuel delivery caused by a faulty MAF or O2 sensor can cause some gnarly sounds but are otherwise harmless in some cases. If you have an OBD2 tool that can read live data, check if your STFT values are pegged all the way at the minimum -31.25% or maximum +31.25% indicating a rich or lean condition and the ECM is compensating the best it can.
 

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The car spent years in impound after being stolen. We bought as something to play with and fix up. It was in perfect condition other than oxidized paint. It has a V6 with 77,000 miles on it and manual transmission.
 

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The car spent years in impound after being stolen. We bought as something to play with and fix up. It was in perfect condition other than oxidized paint. It has a V6 with 77,000 miles on it and manual transmission.
Since the car sat for so long, expect to replace all rubber components. Simply on age alone you should replace the timing belt and water pump. I guarantee you the previous owner never replaced the timing belt which puts you over the interval by 17k miles. If the timing belt lets go, you'll be replacing the valves and pistons which costs more than the car itself. Use "Gates TCKWP315 Engine Timing Belt Kit with Water Pump" for your timing belt kit.

I recommend buying an OBD2 bluetooth tool that supports K-Line and KWP2000 so you can monitor your car's vitals with your phone. I can't recommend what to replace without knowing the metrics I mentioned in my previous post. Otherwise you'll be throwing parts at an unknown problem until it goes way.
 

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We replaced all rubber like hoses and such and had planned on doing the timing belt. We know it didn't break because it still runs but my first thought was it jumped time, but why wouldn't it read this on the diagnostic?
 

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We replaced all rubber like hoses and such and had planned on doing the timing belt. We know it didn't break because it still runs but my first thought was it jumped time, but why wouldn't it read this on the diagnostic?
If it only jumped a tooth or two, it may only be bumping CEL limits, not tripping them. There is some leeway in limits, but you may notice it in driveability.
 

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We replaced all rubber like hoses and such and had planned on doing the timing belt. We know it didn't break because it still runs but my first thought was it jumped time, but why wouldn't it read this on the diagnostic?
I'm not saying your timing belt broke. I'm saying you should replace it immediately because skipping an important $180 kit isn't worth the thousands of dollars in an engine rebuild if it does break. The timing belt interval is 60k miles or every 5 years. On age alone this car should be on its 3rd timing belt.

The ECM self diagnostic is not very smart. It monitors sensors for metrics that fall outside of an allowable range which is often has a large margin for error. Your timing could be off by one tooth and the ECM wouldn't detect it as a timing issue. You may see a misfire code if you're getting incomplete combustion as a result of jumping time but even that's unlikely. Since you have 2 banks of cylinders and the only cam position sensor only resides on bank 1, the ECM can't detect a CAM/CRANK correlation error if bank 2 jumped several teeth. At most you may receive a misfire code for bank 2.

If you believe timing jumped a tooth you need to ask why? A common failure point in the timing loop is the timing tensioner especially on inexpensive timing kits or if the previous owner skipped replacing the tensioner and reused the old one. Let's say the previous owner did replace the timing belt, it's possible that the hydraulic tensioner lost pressure and allowed your timing to jump. If you crack open the timing cover and find any brand names besides Gates, it was done inexpensively and should be replaced immediately no matter when it was done last.
 
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