Hyundai Tiburon Forums banner
21 - 34 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
667 Posts
Is that the oem oil filter? I read the thread about how rough the tibs can run on anything other than oem or k&n kinda seemed like snake oil to me but any truth there in your opinion?
Yeah ive seen those threads too. Ive been running royal purple/amsoil filters on ours without issue. Both are made by the same company. Initially when we bought the car, I tried the mobile1 filter and got some lifter tick. As soon as our amsoil supply came in, no more issues.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,165 Posts
Is that the oem oil filter? I read the thread about how rough the tibs can run on anything other than oem or k&n kinda seemed like snake oil to me but any truth there in your opinion?
Some oil filters let oil drain from the system, this leads to tappet noise for a short bit on startup.
 

·
Premium Member
2006 Hyundai Tiburon SE
Joined
·
1,161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Yes, I use OEM oil filters exclusively as of late. I tried a couple others that were "good quality" but I had problems with nearly all of them. And no, it's not snake oil.

Aftermarket oil filters are not built specifically for our motors and are intended to work on an array of different motors. There is a drain back valve in the OEM filter that either doesn't exist or is valved incorrectly on the aftermarket filters. It is a risk any time you try something else other than OEM. If the engine has been sitting for a while it will tick badly on cold startup with most aftermarket filters which causes damage to the valvetrain.

The OEM filters are so cheap it doesn't make sense to buy anything else. If it's good enough for Hyundai's 100k mile warranty it's good enough for me.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 03tibgts

·
Premium Member
2006 Hyundai Tiburon SE
Joined
·
1,161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I cracked open the clutch assembly last night and found that the TOB broke apart from the inside. As it expanded from centrifugal force it somehow pulled the snap ring out of the ring housing and broke the housing. Looks like it broke once before based on how dirty the metal is at the break point, where-as the recent break shows clean metal. This explains why I couldn't force the TOB back into the snap ring on the side of the road... Typically I would expect this from a low quality clutch brand like EFT, however the TOB was the OEM Valeo brand like all the quality kits come with. It may have been a dud straight out of the box or a fake, I'm not sure.

Jaw Wood Automotive tire Gas Art
Automotive tire Tire Wood Tread Rim
Eyebrow Hood Gesture Art Tints and shades


Also I found a leaky water pump. I used the paper gasket with some rubber sealant and it worked great until my cooling system became over pressurized from a faulty radiator cap. This was the same time that my OEM radiator blew up and I bought the aluminum radiator. I think the excess pressure may have blew the paper gasket as well. Not bad considering I got 65K miles out of this interval. I'll be switching to the OEM MLS style gasket for the next water pump.

Automotive tire Auto part Machine Engineering Metal
 
  • Like
Reactions: 03tibgts

·
Premium Member
2006 Hyundai Tiburon SE
Joined
·
1,161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #26 ·
It's slow at the moment but I've got the new flywheel and friction plate torqued down. I had to cut a custom center alignment hole out of 6061 sheet aluminum because I didn't think to save the original piece from my dual mass flywheel. I'll post more updates in a week when I've had more time on it.

Automotive tire Audio equipment Office equipment Rim Gas

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Rim Engineering Gas
 
  • Like
Reactions: 03tibgts

·
Premium Member
2006 Hyundai Tiburon SE
Joined
·
1,161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I believe the reason behind it is because we share the same flywheel size and bolt pattern with the 6G74 and 6G75 motors but they require a different center piece.
 

·
Premium Member
2006 Hyundai Tiburon SE
Joined
·
1,161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Update: Still slow and waiting on parts to arrive. Some future planning for stage 3 & 4 on the spare block.

Both Alpine kits I obtained have some issues that need to be addressed. The blue kit has a leaky snout seal and the black kit has a broken snout and chewed up rotors. Combined they still don't offer a fully working kit but the path of least resistance seems to be obtaining a new snout seal. I'm still debating whether to rebuild the snout or just replace the seal on the blue kit and send it. The previous owner claims he had the snout rebuilt in the last couple of years and barely drove it so I may just send it with a new seal.

I didn't like the length of the OEM pressure plate bolts at only 15mm or so. Strangely the original bolts from my dual mass were longer at around 20-25mm but the OEM replacements I bought two separate times were shorter by around 5-10mm. For a steel flywheel this might be OK, but since the Fidanza flywheel is aluminum and has deeper mount holes I ordered up some ARP hardware that are reported to be 25mm from the Honda D series motors. I expect to have to trim these down, up-to 3mm, to fit. I'd have a hard time sleeping if I know I've got only 15mm worth of threads in an aluminum flywheel lol...

ARP 1082201

Bought all new front end suspension and steering bits. Mevotech has a front end kit for a price comparable to Moog that include inner and outer power steering tie rod ends. I went with Moog for the lower control arm bushings and ball joints. I'll be pressing them in/out myself keeping the OEM lower control arm. Thankfully we don't salt our roads in Seattle so even at 16 years old they don't have much rust.

MEVOTECH MKIT10722
MOOG K201658 K200692 K500031

I decided to go a different route on the valve springs for my spare motor. The Brian Crower BC1300 springs from the Toyota 2JZ are really close in size but I heard from a reputable member who tried to fit them stating that they don't seat right. I would still like to try this myself to see if there is anything I can do to make adjustments... But for now I purchased a set of Sigma 3.5L springs which are approximately 30% stiffer. These were the same valve springs used on the NGM budget race blocks way back in the day. The valve stem size of the 3.5L is different so no other hardware is compatible from the Sigma cylinder heads unfortunately.

Hyundai 22221-35510

I've been seriously looking at the NGM race block rotating assembly for my spare block in preparation for stage 3 or 4. Some of you may know now that NGM was using Honda H22 rods with custom ROSS pistons at around 8.5-9:1 compression. A reputable member of this forum reports them to be 8.77:1 and another reports them as 8.8:1. This has been confirmed by a couple of reputable members in the Facebook groups and this forum by comparing part numbers and dimensions of existing NGM blocks to parts catalogs. The caveat is that the rods big ends are wider and rod lengths are longer by a couple millimeters. This means that either the crank rod journals or the rod bearings themselves need to be machined for the difference in width then a custom set of pistons with a higher wrist pin (aka shorter compression height) is needed to offset the length. This also means that we can use MUCH better rod bearings from the Honda world. The cost is far less around the 50% mark compared to the "drop-in" CP/Pauter combination that is everyone's go-to at the moment. The following combo is reported to hold over 150HP per hole. TC reported the race blocks are capable of holding 800WHP in a couple of excerpts on these forums and from their site via the web.archive.

Source1: NGM short or long race block
Source2: Nelson Gonzalez

Manley Forged H Beam Connecting Rods with 3/8 ARP 2000 Honda Prelude VTEC H22A H22A1 H22A4
SKU 14016-4
ROSS Piston Specs
Make: Hyundai
Model: V6
Job Card # 113403
Bore: 4.4300"
Net Dia. 3.4250"
Compression Height: 1.119"
Ring Grooves: 0.0485", 0.0605", 0.1495"
Ring Lands: 0.285", 0.175", 0.085"
Pin: 0.866" x 2.500" DBL
Net Dome CC's: -9.3
Dome Height: N/A
Dish Depth: 0.105"
Int V.P. Dia.: N/A
Int V.P. Depth: 0.000
Exh V.P. Dia: N/A
Exh V.P. Depth: 0.000
Font Rectangle Number Event Temperature
 
  • Like
Reactions: 03tibgts

·
Premium Member
2006 Hyundai Tiburon SE
Joined
·
1,161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #30 · (Edited)
Update: Work has been rough to me these last few weeks and I haven't had much time in the garage.

I did manage to install the flywheel/clutch combo and mate the transmission to the engine only to realize in one of my pics I may have forgotten one of the two bolts that hold the heat/dust shield to the engine block. Not a deal breaker but I knew my OCD wouldn't be able to handle knowing it wasn't there... Unfortunately the flywheel had to come out to fit the tiny insignificant bolt...

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Locking hubs Tread
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Motor vehicle Locking hubs


When I tore it back apart the release bearing fork tabs looked bent from using too much force inserting it into the clutch cover's snap ring... so I tried giving it a little tap with my mini sledge hammer and it broke. Not sure of the brand that SPEC uses for their release bearings because it's not stamped anywhere with a part number or brand name... but it looks to be very high quality like the OEM so it's not a quality issue. I just made a mistake. In case anyone is in doubt, my new Hyundai OEM is in fact Valeo branded except the part is stamped with "HMC" on it in addition to the Valeo logo where my previous Valeo release bearings from other kits did not have the HMC stamp:

Automotive tire Food Font Electric blue Automotive wheel system


In talking with Faulcun and another guy in the Facebook groups we determined that the Sigma 3.5 valve springs are either out of stock everywhere or have very low stock. Not enough to make a full set of 24 from a single purchase. They're only about 30% stiffer than the 2.7 Delta valve springs which is perfect for .349" to .370" lift regrinds. Faulcun pointed me to some 6G74 non-Mivec springs by Melling that would work but I'm going to put the stiffer springs on the back burner for my next motor build.

In an attempt to reduce intake air temps I plan to ceramic coat and heat wrap the coolant pipe directly underneath the lower intake manifold. In addition to that I plan to relocate the IAT bung to the lower intake manifold (Similar to GuamBomb's aka @overboostshark's setup for his MP90 car) and switch to a more accurate/faster acting Haltech GM IAT to a suitable location that represents the hot side of the supercharger. Here' is a pic I stole from GuamBomb's IG showing his GM IAT location where he used a 3/8 bung for standard GM IATs. Only difference is I plan to use the Haltect M14 sized IAT and bung.

Automotive exterior Bumper Automotive lighting Cuisine Gas


Several months ago I worked with CoolCow while remotely tuning his stage 2 Alpine setup and we remapped his IAT calibration for the Haltech IAT sensor. His driving logs show that when IATs reach a certain threshold, the ignition timing that would typically be around 24 degrees of advance are pulled down to about 19 degrees of advance. Here is the correlation of the intake air temps in white to the timing advance in yellow during a pull. The cyan vertical marker shows where the readings are from the top right corner of this graph. This shows ignition timing pulled down to 18.5 degrees of advance at peak IAT temp in that specific pull.

Building Font Entertainment Electric blue Magenta


If the standard Alpine or NGM IAT location on the cold side of the supercharger were used in this case, no ignition timing would be pulled at this high of IAT temperatures and the tune would have maintained 24 degrees of advance on the standard NGM tune. I think this is where Alpine and NGM went wrong on their development causing some people to blow their motors as low as stage 2. This is something I want to improve on for engine longevity and safer daily driven supercharged Tiburons.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,165 Posts
Bolt lengths (per one of my "nuts and bolts" stickies).....in general, bolt/screw should engage at least 1 diameter if both are hard material like steel, 2 diameters in softer material like brass or aluminum. Thus a 10mm diameter steel bolt should go at least 10mm into a steel or cast iron block, 20mm into an aluminum head.
 

·
Premium Member
2006 Hyundai Tiburon SE
Joined
·
1,161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Bolt lengths (per one of my "nuts and bolts" stickies).....in general, bolt/screw should engage at least 1 diameter if both are hard material like steel, 2 diameters in softer material like brass or aluminum. Thus a 10mm diameter steel bolt should go at least 10mm into a steel or cast iron block, 20mm into an aluminum head.
I shortened those Honda D series ARP bolts successfully down to about 23mm. I feel much better using those with a little blue loctite. They came with flat washers instead of lock washers so i need the loctite. Feels much safer than using the OEM 15mm long bolts intended for steel flywheels. Didn't take much material off, just what I needed to make sure the bolts weren't bottoming out into the flywheel.

Automotive tire Wood Font Gas Tool
 

·
Premium Member
2006 Hyundai Tiburon SE
Joined
·
1,161 Posts
Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Actually i think it was the Theta II 2.4L springs that were a closer match.
Oops my bad. I was running on 4 hrs of sleep in 36 hours when I wrote that.

I'll pickup one of each to test fit in my spare head to see if there are any problems with fitment. The inner diameter was a little narrower than our OEM springs which could pose a problem with the retainer or spring seat.
 
21 - 34 of 34 Posts
Top