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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,
I decided it would be nice to share my auto to manual conversion experience. This project took me between 2 and 3 months, all of which was doing bits and pieces after work and on the weekend. I apologise in advance but I took little to no pictures to share. Also I should add that I already had a megasquirt 2 installed, and had standalone ecu capabilities. And I took advantage of having everything apart to install new suspension, cleanup wiring harnesses, and paint/detail my engine, and removed the cats.

First off, I made a phonecall to a somewhat local auto salvage yard(Hansers from Billings MT). And they had a same year(2005 V6 6 speed) tib. I bought the transmission, shifter with cables, wheel hubs/knuckles, intermediate shaft, and brake/ clutch pedal. All with 133k miles, my tib has 93 but I figured what the hell. They quoted me for 575$ total. I then ordered everything else from Rock Auto and a Hyundai dealer website called "hyundaipartsdeal.com". I ordered the CV axles, clutch, and hydraulics from Rock Auto. One cool thing to note: being that the stock tubs have dual mass flywheels, Rock Auto sells a "solid flywheel conversion kit" which had everything including the longer flywheel bolts and such. I also had to order the clutch resivor, and hardline clutch line from that dealer website. All in on the brand new parts was probably another 700 or 800, I never tallied it up.

The tools I used were pretty rudimentary. I used wood planks and some cinder blocks to get my tib high enough off the ground with my little jack I had. And bought this engine support bar from Harbor Freight. That bar sits on the front aprons and let's your engine and whatever else hang. On the one end unchained up the engine, and the other was the tranny(along with ratchet straps). An electric impact wrench and and electric Socket Wrench proved very very handy. Also I used one of those through whole socket wrenches because they are more low profile, like a gear wrench.

Finally was the big "full steam ahead"! First thing I did after I had my tib about two feet in the air in the front, was I removed all suspension components from either side. Disconnected all the engine mounts and anything else that was held to the subframe. Now I unbolted my steering rack but bungee corded it so I wouldn't have to remove it from the vehicle which worked good. Also you will have to remove your exhaust, and I personally have the same time use this opportunity to delete the cats so I could get a accurate reading after the exhaust combined with my mega squirt. Then I used combination of bottom Jack some large metal square tubing to provide extra lift, cinder blocks, wood planks, the OEM Jack, my little hydraulic jack, and a little bench pressing in order to unbolt and lower the subframe. I just leaned this up against my garage outside because it's big and in the way haha. And during this all I left everything to do with steering in the same spot because I hate going to the alignment shop. After the subframe was removed I got some more ratchet straps and hooked onto the transmission with that engine support bar and chain. The chain has this all thread with a hook on the end so you can raise and lower as needed. With the transmission tight I unbolted it and separated it with a little crowbar/pry bar. you do have to be careful because as I found out the torque converter likes to think it can fly, and it jumped out and landed on the floor. Speaking of which a cheap $20 Walmart rug is really nice for putting on a concrete floor just to make things more comfy. But then with that engine support bar I just did incremental lowerings, until it finally hit the ground and then I slid it out of the way. Then unbolt the flex plate and all that yada yada yada. This is where the flywheel conversion kit came in handy because I thought I forgot I needed long flywheel bolts but then I remembered they were hiding in the box. But then it's just as simple as put the flywheel on like it was originally a manual, clutch pressure plate all that. Then I recommend finding a courteous friend who finds your project amusing to help you get the transmission in especially if you're using that support bar. In essence I just made yay or nay grunting noises until we got the transmission wiggled in, it was pretty tight getting the Bell around the clutch without digging up any of the fingers and getting the butt end of the transmission to clear the fender apron. But after a couple rounds of ratchet strapping and lifting and re-lifting,eventually got the transmission to the right spot and just had to sort of do a bench press squeeze to mate the two together. Then after that you have to take the alternator off in order to get the new intermediate shaft on. But after that I redid my exhaust cut out a bunch of the old automatic wiring harness. The clutch pedal has to go right where the automatic transmission computer went, which requires some whole poking but overall not too horrible. Then you have to swap the smaller brake pedal onto the brake booster. And after that you fight to put the subframe back on and do all the suspension reattaching, with the new CV axles of course and I put the 6-speed wheel hubs on because I couldn't remember if there's any difference at the wheel side of the axles. The splines on the six-speed manual for the transmission output are definitely larger.

One thing to note about the six-speed is the upper transmission mount on the driver side fender is either back ordered to high hell or they no longer make it. I can only ever find the five speed bracket and the automatic ones, so I had to kind of get creative fabricate one that would fit the six speed out of the old automatic one.

Another note the six-speed and four-speed automatic transmission use the same wheel speed sensor and that signal does not go through the automatic computer, so I still have an oem speedometer.

All in all, I was expecting this project to be a lot larger of a hassle. And I expected it to be a lot more expensive. I don't think I spent any more than 1500 at the most, excluding labor. but considering it took 3 months and it was a project that I had fun with I think it was worth it all around. Car runs and drives great, and it's like you never knew it was an automatic to begin with.

If anyone has any questions or comments I'd be glad to answer or hear them, it was fun and successful all around. I may take pictures of the completed build and attach them later.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Your car runs on a megasquirt ms2? How is the tune running?
Yes! And actually it runs great! Well did anyways haha, after I moved some sensors around I have to retune it. I moved the o2 sensor further down the pipe instead of just on the one header. I'm not saying it's bulletproof or anything but the ms2 is an awesome ecu!
 

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Yes! And actually it runs great! Well did anyways haha, after I moved some sensors around I have to retune it. I moved the o2 sensor further down the pipe instead of just on the one header. I'm not saying it's bulletproof or anything but the ms2 is an awesome ecu!
I have the same ecu in my car , only thing I can't get straight is accel enrichment so it has a slight stubble on take off other than that it's fine
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have the same ecu in my car , only thing I can't get straight is accel enrichment so it has a slight stubble on take off other than that it's fine
Yea I hear ya there, do you have an automatic or manual? With my setup, once I installed the ms2 I had so much trouble tuning because the automatic would be hunting for gears. But now I can lock it in one gear and hopefully spend some more quality time tuning.
 

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Yea I hear ya there, do you have an automatic or manual? With my setup, once I installed the ms2 I had so much trouble tuning because the automatic would be hunting for gears. But now I can lock it in one gear and hopefully spend some more quality time tuning.
It's a 6 speed manual
 
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