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Discussion Starter #61 (Edited)
Yeah, sorry guys, things are going to have be delayed a little bit.

Last sunday I drove the car on the road as part of my second round of testing. The first round consisted of just driving in the lot, and doing a lot of brake tests to wear in my sandblasted front rotors, and rusty rear rotors lol. I only had about 10-15 minutes of time to drive it, but hey it felt good enough such that it could go through its next and final step i.e. the alignment. So on Tuesday morning when I was reversing out the engine died. Seemed like a timing belt issue. So I inspected it that night after work and turn out that bank 2's cam gear came loose, even though I torqued it to spec (probably 75 ft-lbs - manual calls for 65-80). Now interestingly enough, the belt didn't completely slip off, it was only halfway off the one cam gear, and in place everywhere else. So I took off the tensioner, slipped the belt back on and torqued the cam 30% greater than recommended torque (100ft-lbs). Then reinstalled tensioner and manually turned the crank. Got about 90% of a crank rotation until it stopped rotating. Interestingly enough, by the looks of it, it seemed belt was not not out of timing (in the 90% of rotation I didn't quite get far enough for all three timing marks to line up so can't say 100%). so I took out the spark plugs on bank 2, which was easy to do on cylinders 4 & 6 but not #2. Even though I torqued all spark plugs to the same specification. #2 was extremely hard to get out, had to put in some muscle on that ratchet. Then looking into the tube I could see what looked like a valve, and sure enough the piston was in contact with it. It has been confusing but I have been trying to figure out how a piston could hit a valve despite not being out of timing. Either A) the valve failed regardless, or B) the timing belt skipped teeth and then jumped back the same number of teeth or just somehow ended up in the same position as before. I'll tell you this though: the tensioner is super strong, an OEM Hyundai part, so I have somewhat of a hard time believing the belt could have that much slack.

Anyway, I picked up another engine already, with 120KM / 75k Miles on it. Looks to be quite clean. Gonna go hard at it this weekend to drop it in. Then I will tear apart my original engine later and inspect it, followed by possibly rebuilding it- I'll figure it out later.

It's annoying, but whatever, I'm not devasted despite being super excited to drive this again after a two-year absence now. There are more important things in life. Really enjoyed the SC though. Man, did that ever feel and sound nice. And, fully manual steering is something else. More difficult than I thought it would be, but I like it.. I want more. lol
 

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you could go for just the head build. the piston is probably not damaged.
 

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Discussion Starter #63
you could go for just the head build. the piston is probably not damaged.
Fair point. It seems like it's just one exhaust valve that's bent. I suppose I could have somewhat easily replaced the head considering it's bank 2 (I mean I haven't done this before though, so unsure how "easily" that is). I didn't really think about doing that for some reason.. (I guess probably because I haven't done it before so there's an increased degree of risk and potentially taking longer to do than engine replacement, for possibly the same amount of cost). But for what it's worth I started the removal process today. Got about halfway done of the procedure to get the engine out. So I should have it out tomorrow. The plus side with this replacement engine is that now I could improve on something. I am going to attempt to use a wire wheel and sand down the block this time instead of painting it, because this time I happened to have remembered wire wheels existed lol. I think I am also going to order an OEM timing belt because I don't like the slack on the belt on the replacement engine. It's probably the original belt, which is scary, because it's 15 years old then. I hardly even trusted the never-used 5 year-old Gates that I just had, though it seemingly looks just fine on initial inspection.
 

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Discussion Starter #64
Looks like I've scored some time for an update today. This will bring the build up to speed through the remainder of 2019's progress.


After dropping in the engine and polishing some parts I knew I could go a little further with cleaning up this engine design. The stock Delta design is a bit of a strange one. For example: On one hand, the alternator is nicely tucked away down at the oil pan near the firewall (also a slight weight distribution advantage) though this comes at the cost of cumbersome replacement due to having to remove the drive axles. In the name of clean design I am ok with that. A lot of other engines have the alternator prominently at the top. Now, on the other hand the Delta has spark plug wires fully exposed, among other wires running right across the engine, cluttering it up. Granted, it was intended for an engine cover, and while I've always like the design of our engine cover, it is effectively useless, extra weight, and kind of a cheat for a clean engine bay. I can do better.

First up: Those spark plug wires.
Very simply, I thought these could be tucked away and covered up, but it meant getting really custom. I.E. I will have make a part. So I took some measurements and printed a mock-up:



Unfortunately due to some print issues I couldn’t really confirm fitment but went head and printed a mold anyway to produce a CF ignition wire cover for Bank 2. This was my first time producing a part like this so I figured I might as well try and experiment.







It came out OK but definitely not perfect. Fitment was off due to some incorrect dimensions. I experimented with re-coating it with resin, sanding it and sprayed clear coat. Definitely learned from this round and planned on redoing it when I’d have the time.

So what’s next? Now there’s the coil packs, I’d like to tuck those away too. I thought I’d create a CF part to box those in, and figured that would be easier to produce than the wires cover. Again, same process of printing a mold and laying CF:





Came out better than the wires cover, but decided to hold off on finishing it with clear coat or anything else just yet because upon seeing this box in place I thought it would be nice to have it line up with the valve cover. So I went ahead and relocated the box over an inch or so.



I was pretty happy with that and where it was going, but there was something missing … I know! I will make a second box for Bank 1. It would hide some hoses, wiring, the PCV, and oil catch can. It would also partially tuck the fuel hoses and heater core hoses. So here’s another:



Upon seeing this though… I felt the need to paint both of their lids red. That way the red colour in the engine bay will be a little better balanced proportionally. Consider our V6 occupies almost exactly one half width of the engine bay, whereas an I4 or transverse V8 occupies like two-thirds of the open width. My colour scheme here has only the top of engine red and rest is greyscale- extending the red colour into the driver’s side half of the bay will better balance that out a bit. So you can see in the above image I experimented with the lid shape design by printing out that pink piece. Eventually I came up a form that I believed would fit best. So I had to print a new mold for the lids. Since they’d be painted I made them in FG this time:



You can see I also took a sneaky route for Bank 1’s spark plug wires – wrapping them in a braided sleeve and tucked them under the fuel rail & UIM. That’s about as tucked away as they can be without converting to COP.

Now for a break with something different:

I smoked the brake master cylinder, as the white reservoir would otherwise stand out too much:






And here’s a bracket I made to support the SC:

 

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nice! would you be averse to making another carbon spark plug cover? i'd very much like to buy one. at whatever price you feel is appropriate given the time and materials you spend on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #66
nice! would you be averse to making another carbon spark plug cover? i'd very much like to buy one. at whatever price you feel is appropriate given the time and materials you spend on it.
haha I had a feeling someone would be interested. I am sure I'll show it in a near-future update but I did in fact re-design it and made it again. Much better this time around, looking forward to showing the final one. Based on that one I have some ideas to improve it a little more still. On V2, the current version, the main issue it has is the CF cloth isn't straight - it curved a lot especially around the vertical (well, angled) walls around the top of plugs (expected that but not really an issue IMO). But I'd see what I could do for the next time. Note that I designed this cover to fit plugs that are circular on the top, like my NGKs. I noticed OEM isn't circular for example, in which case I'd simply leave the top closed. So PM me what wires you have - I may have to ask for dimensions if theyre not NGK. One last thing: I need to test it, I.E. through daily driving and see how it holds up to heat for example. It is possible I might have to remake it using a different resin/epoxy for example. Also while writing this I realized you have the I4 - did you acquire a V6?
 

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yes. i did acquire a v6.
i still have my i4. but now my v6 is listed in my sig now too.

(OEM plug wires. might get new wires at some point tho. these current wires are original. and there's so much brittle plastic crumbling in my bay.)

As for heat vs carbon epoxy resin, the resin is a chemical cure, rather than a solvent cure, so the heat can end up being a catalyst for curing. check the MSDS of the epoxy, but i'm fairly certain that the temperature range for the epoxy is within norms for an NA non-vented hood/SC vented hood under-hood-temperature.
 

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While I like the look, not sure I want CF that close to plug wires, I would be checking for arcing.
 

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Discussion Starter #70
While I like the look, not sure I want CF that close to plug wires, I would be checking for arcing.
Would that be because of their new proximity to each other, or is there a reason that the CF material would promote arcing? I did have a similar thought when I was creating this but I thought I'd test it and find out. I am using NGK wires which seem to be thicker than OEM (I can measure and find out for sure) so there's that.
 

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Real CF IS conductive....you have the CF mounted to the block (a good ground) and any insulation issues in plug wires want to do easy path back to battery/ground instead of jumping the electrode gap (especially high engine load or compression).
Thus misfires, when damp out, promote plug arcing from wires to engine.
Not saying you'll have an issue, just looking down the road.
If you start to get misfires, maybe remove covers and see if issue goes away or look for arcing.
 

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Discussion Starter #72
Real CF IS conductive....you have the CF mounted to the block (a good ground) and any insulation issues in plug wires want to do easy path back to battery/ground instead of jumping the electrode gap (especially high engine load or compression).
Thus misfires, when damp out, promote plug arcing from wires to engine.
Not saying you'll have an issue, just looking down the road.
If you start to get misfires, maybe remove covers and see if issue goes away or look for arcing.
Interesting. I wasn't aware it was a conductor. It is however coated in polyester resin which I believe might be the saving grace here by the sounds of it.
I will keep this in mind if any such issues start happening.
 

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Interesting. I wasn't aware it was a conductor. It is however coated in polyester resin which I believe might be the saving grace here by the sounds of it.
I will keep this in mind if any such issues start happening.
if in doubt, get some rubber-like coating like bedliner or rubber gasketing of sorts and put it on the underside.

TBH though, the insulative strength of the rubber on the wires and on the plug caps far exceeds the necessary threshold to prevent arcing. while CF is conductive, it's not going to cause issues being used in this way. the wires sometimes will sit on the head aluminum without covers, and even when wet, it won't arc through the rubber. it's much easier to arc over the small air gap at the plug tip than through the rubber.
 

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Discussion Starter #74
if in doubt, get some rubber-like coating like bedliner or rubber gasketing of sorts and put it on the underside.

TBH though, the insulative strength of the rubber on the wires and on the plug caps far exceeds the necessary threshold to prevent arcing. while CF is conductive, it's not going to cause issues being used in this way. the wires sometimes will sit on the head aluminum without covers, and even when wet, it won't arc through the rubber. it's much easier to arc over the small air gap at the plug tip than through the rubber.
All valid points from you & Charlie. Good call on a rubberized coating, I think I may do that within the coil box at least.
 

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if in doubt, get some rubber-like coating like bedliner or rubber gasketing of sorts and put it on the underside.

TBH though, the insulative strength of the rubber on the wires and on the plug caps far exceeds the necessary threshold to prevent arcing. while CF is conductive, it's not going to cause issues being used in this way. the wires sometimes will sit on the head aluminum without covers, and even when wet, it won't arc through the rubber. it's much easier to arc over the small air gap at the plug tip than through the rubber.
Newer wires, I agree.
Older wires, guess you've never seen them arc right through the wire. On some cases of misfires, I look for white/gray marks on grounded stuff where a plug wire is close to it especially when it's damp out.
 
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Newer wires, I agree.
Older wires, guess you've never seen them arc right through the wire. On some cases of misfires, I look for white/gray marks on grounded stuff where a plug wire is close to it especially when it's damp out.
that to me points to something like old cracked rubber or some place where there's an air path exposed, since ionization of air is much easier. when wet, of course the water has dissolved ions in it for most rain water, so it would conduct if it soaked through.

it should be fine for most people though, the cover.
 

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Discussion Starter #78
As of this weekend I have been driving my car again, finally. Though it's not without its issues. Two annoying issues: P0501 & P0507. Last time I replaced the ABS/speed sensor was in 2012, so I guess it's time for a replacement? And for idle.. ugh, it's not as bad as it was with my previous engine, which would have the idle range up and down above 2K RPM, but now I still have a hunting idle though it fluctuates only between 1.5K to 2K. It makes me look rather silly at stop lights but whatever I'm happy to be driving my car. Eventually it does stop though after in the ballpark of 30s, but it idles at 1100. My RPMs have never been below 1100 at any point driving it. I am not sure if the IAC is the issue, I did clean it prior to installing and is OEM Hyundai - but I could not tell you how old it is - I believe it was a used part that I installed in 2014. If it's not the IAC then it's probably a vac leak, likely at the intake manifold (either or both lower + upper). I am leaning towards the latter as I suspect I sanded the mating surfaces with too coarse of sandpaper. I think I started with 80 grit on my previous engine. With my replacement engine I used a 320 sponge this time, but still I transferred over my LIM which I believe I might've been too coarse on. Plus I reused the gaskets, but I used them for a very short time so I figured they were still ok.

Looking forward to updating this thread though.
 

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Cheap easy gasket fix.....remove gasket, thin smear of wheel bearing grease on both sides.
You can always just start car, then spray carb cleaner/or similar on all intake joints, then vacuum lines, If engine revs change, you're sucking in "fuel". Fix that leak.
 

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Discussion Starter #80
Cheap easy gasket fix.....remove gasket, thin smear of wheel bearing grease on both sides.
Yeah? Was not expecting wheel bearing grease to be the right option here. I did consider using silicone, like you would on valve covers. For what it's worth I happen to have an extra set of gaskets but am unsure if merely replacing them would solve the issue.

You can always just start car, then spray carb cleaner/or similar on all intake joints, then vacuum lines, If engine revs change, you're sucking in "fuel". Fix that leak.
Yeah, I tried that when I had my previous engine in. And nothing happened. Tried it in all gasket & hose areas, even for prolonged periods of time. I even tried just spraying it at the intake filter to test it and nothing happened. Odd, considering I remember when I was first showed this trick the guy sprayed some in the intake and it revved a bit. Maybe the brand matters here, I used CRC throttle body cleaner.

I forget if I ended up trying starter fluid. Is carb cleaner the better option here?


Edit: come to think of it.. I do now have a spare LIM thanks to the replacement engine. I could replace it + use new gaskets. Might be the best approach.
 
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