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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, end this debate with my roommate and me. I think I need to use 91 octane, because on page two of my manual it says "Unleaded gasoline with a Pump Octane Rating of 87 (Research Octane Number 91) or higher must be used on your Hyundai."

So, my question is, if I run the standard 87 octane at the pump, am I damaging my tib?

Please help end this debate, and let me know if I am slowly killing my car right now, because I am running 87 in it.

:3_frown:
 

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You don't need 91/93. Its a waste of money unless you are boosted or are highly N/A modified. Save your money... Now lock this thread somebody.
 

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DarkSouledSRT said:
You don't need 91/93. Its a waste of money unless you are boosted or are highly N/A modified. Save your money... Now lock this thread somebody.
Yup for once you say something good lol jk

Its personal preference you dont need 91 or higher for a stock tibb its a waste of money. If your boosted or a high N/A tibb then go ahead and do it. other than that put 91 on it once a month to clean the heads and pistons if you want.
 

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I run 93 octane when I can just so I don't hear spark knock. But when I find gas under $2.10 and its 87 octane, I'll jump on it. I run 100 octane thru mine once a month to clean the injectors, etc. I would run that all the time if I could but it's $5.99 a gallon..... :3_nooo:

But to answer your question. You really only need to run 87 octane which is just 87 octane.
 

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wolfi92 said:
Ok, end this debate with my roommate and me. I think I need to use 91 octane, because on page two of my manual it says "Unleaded gasoline with a Pump Octane Rating of 87 (Research Octane Number 91) or higher must be used on your Hyundai."
The pump octane rating is an average of RON (Research Octane Number) and MON (Motor Octane Number). Pump Octane Rating is (RON+MON)/2. RON is always higher than MON. Gasoline that has a 91 RON is 87 octane at the pump.

Bottom line: if you are mostly stock (no turbo, supercharger or nitrous) then you are wasting money if you use anything higher than 87 octane.
 

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SuperSaiyan said:
I run 93 octane when I can just so I don't hear spark knock. But when I find gas under $2.10 and its 87 octane, I'll jump on it. I run 100 octane thru mine once a month to clean the injectors, etc. I would run that all the time if I could but it's $5.99 a gallon..... :3_nooo:

But to answer your question. You really only need to run 87 octane which is just 87 octane.
You my friend, are an idiot. Like has ben posted MANY MANY times on here before, (and probably hundreds of other websites/forums just like it), there is no benefit to running a higher octane than is required (for an NA tib, that would be 87). In your case do you hear this so called spark knock you are talking about when you run 87? If not, why are you running 93, or once a month 100? There are ABSOLUTELY NO BENEFITS to doing so, and actually might hurt your performance (especially the 100) because it will take so long to fully ignite.

You say you do it to "clean the injectors", but unless you run ****** gas for the rest of the month, then one tank of 100 octane premium gas, you will see no benefit from that. Regardless of the octane, all gas that is at least a decent brand, includes cleaners and additives in the fuel. 99% of the time, the same cleaners/additives in 87 are used in 93, or maybe even 100 in your case. If you really want to clean your injectors, use a good fuel cleaner like Chevron Techron fuel system cleaner (which is supposedly the on of the easiest on injector seals) periodically. And by periodically I mean every 6 months, because if you did that every month, you would be degrading your injectors with too many harsh chemicals.



Now back to the original poster, the book says "Pump Octane Rating of 87 (Research Octane Number 91)" - they are the same thing. US pumps typically use a pump octane rating figure. Some other countries use a Research Octane Number (also known as RON) in rating their gas. A RON of 91 is equivalent to 86-87 octane here in the states.
 

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i have always used 91 just for the fact its a cleaner gas along with full synthetic oil , whether or not it will help save my engine from the way i drive; we'll have to wait and see... but damn, 91 sure gets pricey after a while
 

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Malogus said:
If you really want to clean your injectors, use a good fuel cleaner like Chevron Techron fuel system cleaner (which is supposedly the on of the easiest on injector seals) periodically. And by periodically I mean every 6 months, because if you did that every month, you would be degrading your injectors with too many harsh chemicals.
^^^ What he said. Techron is great stuff.


ddemlong said:
i have always used 91 just for the fact its a cleaner gas along with full synthetic oil , whether or not it will help save my engine from the way i drive; we'll have to wait and see... but damn, 91 sure gets pricey after a while
That is not true. All levels of octane fuel are required to meet cleanliest standards.
 

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myslow1 said:
you actually are doing yourself worse going higher octane when it isnt needed,because you will not get a consistant burn....
Exactly. 91 is pointless unless you are having knock issues. Then look into 89 even before you go to 91.

Honestly, the best thing you can all do for your cars is to run good oil (like synthetic) and a clean filter at every oil change, keep your air filter clean, and make sure you are running spark plugs in the correct heat range. The oil and air filter will keep harmful dirt and contiminants out of your engine, and the correct spark plugs will help your car run efficiently. With those 3 things you will get the best gas mileage, and the least amount of wear on your engine.

And if you really want to make your engine last long, keep the rpms down. A car that is driven regularly up near redline is typically going to bite the dust before a car driven by a grandma who never takes it over 3500.
 

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NovaResource said:
The pump octane rating is an average of RON (Research Octane Number) and MON (Motor Octane Number). Pump Octane Rating is (RON+MON)/2. RON is always higher than MON. Gasoline that has a 91 RON is 87 octane at the pump.

Bottom line: if you are mostly stock (no turbo, supercharger or nitrous) then you are wasting money if you use anything higher than 87 octane.
Yep, there it is, end of debate.

Pump Octane Rating 87 = Research Octane Rating 91


POR is the number you'll see on the pump at the gas station. Don't know why the Tib book even mentions RON...
 

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Malogus said:
Exactly. 91 is pointless unless you are having knock issues. Then look into 89 even before you go to 91.

Honestly, the best thing you can all do for your cars is to run good oil (like synthetic) and a clean filter at every oil change, keep your air filter clean, and make sure you are running spark plugs in the correct heat range. The oil and air filter will keep harmful dirt and contiminants out of your engine, and the correct spark plugs will help your car run efficiently. With those 3 things you will get the best gas mileage, and the least amount of wear on your engine.

And if you really want to make your engine last long, keep the rpms down. A car that is driven regularly up near redline is typically going to bite the dust before a car driven by a grandma who never takes it over 3500.
But truley where is the fun in that.... vrooooom:3_zoefzoe
 

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Mid_West said:
Yep, there it is, end of debate.

Pump Octane Rating 87 = Research Octane Rating 91


POR is the number you'll see on the pump at the gas station. Don't know why the Tib book even mentions RON...
so whats pump 91 octane? like 95 ROR?
 

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From wikipedia, with the best part in italics.

The most common type of octane rating worldwide is the Research Octane Number (RON). RON is determined by running the fuel through a specific test engine with a variable compression ratio under controlled conditions, and comparing these results with those for mixtures of isooctane and n-heptane.

There is another type of octane rating, called Motor Octane Number (MON) or the aviation lean octane rating, which is a better measure of how the fuel behaves when under load. MON testing uses a similar test engine to that used in RON testing, but with a preheated fuel mixture, a higher engine speed, and variable ignition timing to further stress the fuel's knock resistance. Depending on the composition of the fuel, the MON of a modern gasoline will be about 8 to 10 points lower than the RON. Normally fuel specifications require both a minimum RON and a minimum MON.

In most countries (including all of Europe and Australia) the "headline" octane that would be shown on the pump is the RON, but in the United States and some other countries the headline number is the average of the RON and the MON, sometimes called the Anti-Knock Index (AKI), Road Octane Number (RdON), Pump Octane Number (PON), or (R+M)/2. Because of the 8 to 10 point difference noted above, this means that the octane in the United States will be about 4 to 5 points lower than the same fuel elsewhere: 87 octane fuel, the "regular" gasoline in the US and Canada, would be 91-95 (regular) in Europe.
 

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NovaResource said:
Because RON is very common outside the United States.
Yep. Learned something new today. I [heart] wikipedia :)
 

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Mid_West said:
From wikipedia, with the best part in italics.

The most common type of octane rating worldwide is the Research Octane Number (RON). RON is determined by running the fuel through a specific test engine with a variable compression ratio under controlled conditions, and comparing these results with those for mixtures of isooctane and n-heptane.

There is another type of octane rating, called Motor Octane Number (MON) or the aviation lean octane rating, which is a better measure of how the fuel behaves when under load. MON testing uses a similar test engine to that used in RON testing, but with a preheated fuel mixture, a higher engine speed, and variable ignition timing to further stress the fuel's knock resistance. Depending on the composition of the fuel, the MON of a modern gasoline will be about 8 to 10 points lower than the RON. Normally fuel specifications require both a minimum RON and a minimum MON.

In most countries (including all of Europe and Australia) the "headline" octane that would be shown on the pump is the RON, but in the United States and some other countries the headline number is the average of the RON and the MON, sometimes called the Anti-Knock Index (AKI), Road Octane Number (RdON), Pump Octane Number (PON), or (R+M)/2. Because of the 8 to 10 point difference noted above, this means that the octane in the United States will be about 4 to 5 points lower than the same fuel elsewhere: 87 octane fuel, the "regular" gasoline in the US and Canada, would be 91-95 (regular) in Europe.
Dang, you really know your stuff, thanks for all the input guys, gas is going down right now here in sunny SFL but I know that is just an illusion, so if I don't have to spend more money on gas, I won't. Plus, that money can go to better oil, and more mods, YEA!

:bigcool:
 
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