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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
1962 Ford Falcon Futura




History of the Car:
My grandfather bought this car sometime between 1964 and 1966. He drove it for a few years, and when my dad was old enough to start driving, this was his first car. He drove it until he left for college, and my grandfather resumed driving it until 1985. Since 1985, it has been sitting out in the rain, snow, hail, etc. completely uncovered collecting rust. Well, ever since I was 2-years-old, I've had a dream of owning this car. I've always told my grandfather, "That's going to be my car one day." It was always sort of a joke at family get-togethers. However, when I got a job and finally started getting money in my pocket, I decided to make my dream come true. I opened a savings account and have been slowly accumulating funds to make the car driveable. So far, I've got about $2,000 saved up. And while that may not be much to some people, and surely isn't enough to even come close to restoring the car, it's enough to keep me motivated and working for this car.

Plans for the Car:
I've had a lot of different ideas for this car over the years I've spent dreaming about it. At first I wanted to just restore it to its original state and make it a weekend cruiser and show car. Then as I got more interested in power and speed, I thought about making it strictly a race car. The Falcon is a light car, so it would make a good track car. My most recent idea, and the most probable, is to combine the two. I want to make it as fast as possible, while still keeping it street legal and driveable, and maintaining the classic look of it. As of now, the only thing I'm really set on is a 351 Windsor motor. I figured I could get one for a grand or two and build it myself, with the help of my dad, brother, and friends. I'm also pretty set on making it a fourster (4-speed on the floor), as opposed to the three-on-the-tree it has now. My dad has agreed to help me pay for parts, as long as I share the car with him. :3_chubby:



I just thought I'd share that with you guys. I'm really excited to get started working on it. The car is in Indiana right now at my grandparents' house, but I'm going to rent a trailer the next time we go up there and bring it on down so I can get started on it. After talking to quite a few people, including a few mechanics, it's been said that all the car needs to be driveable is a new set of wheels/tires, and some new brakes.

Of course, I'm open to any and all comments, suggestions, and opinions. Generally speaking, I'm pretty knowledgable when it comes to sport compacts, but I've never really dealt with older cars, so I'm kind of clueless right now. I've been doing my fair share of research though, so I'm getting there.
 

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ive done a restore on a 66 bug that had been sitting in the desert for abour 25 years, it was in simliar condition, and the most important part is gonna be to get all that rust off, that should be your first priority. looks like a fun project, looks like its got alot of potential, especially with a 351 windsor. if you do your own work, that 2 grand can go a LONG way, we spent almost nothing on the bug when we restored it, but we painted it and everything like that ourselves and did all our own work. do you have a timeline your shooting to have it done, or at least drivable by? best of luck on it
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Bakerking31 said:
ive done a restore on a 66 bug that had been sitting in the desert for abour 25 years, it was in simliar condition, and the most important part is gonna be to get all that rust off, that should be your first priority. looks like a fun project, looks like its got alot of potential, especially with a 351 windsor. if you do your own work, that 2 grand can go a LONG way, we spent almost nothing on the bug when we restored it, but we painted it and everything like that ourselves and did all our own work. do you have a timeline your shooting to have it done, or at least drivable by? best of luck on it
Nah, I'm not really in any rush to get it done. I'd of course like to have it done A.S.A.P., but I don't need it done in any certain amount of time or anything. I figured the rust would be the biggest hassle. The interior is pretty torn up too, so I'll be needing to get all new seats, carpeting, etc. for it as well. How do you go about repairing rust like that? A lot of the spots are really bad, to where it's not just surface rust. What I mean is, if you were to push on certain spots of the car, it would make a hole. How do you fix that?

EDIT: You can see what I'm talking about in the picture. You can tell parts of the rear wheel arch have chipped/broken away.
 

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you need to sand it all off, and if you are left with holes, gotta fill em by welding if you can.

as for the inside, if you know much about upolstering you should try to just restore the seats yourself, we redid ours stripping the old fabric off and using the frame basically and the only cost to us was the price of the fabric, and it only took a few hours to do. its not too hard to do yourself, and saves alot of money. if your dash panels are bad, than that might be a pain to replace, because you cant really restore that, hopefully they are in good condition, but i kinda doubt it.
 

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Cool! I think you should stick with the original equipment though. The car will be worth more with the original straight six than a Windsor, and same goes for the tranny. I'm also a big fan of carburettors, there's something disappointing when you open up the hood of an old car and its got fuel injection. And those old sixes can be tuned.

Also, you can save a lot of money if you are willing to do things yourself, and there are some things that you can do without any special training. Like when you want to paint the car, it's easy enough to pull off exterior trim and bumpers and doors and what not. And when you paint it, I'd get a color that is appropriate to a 1960s car. Modern cars have metallics or pearlescent paint, and it's just different.

Rust: gotta cut/grind/sand it out completely and fit new metal sheet to those holes and weld them on. There might be places that sell replacement panels for Ford Falcons, and if so you might just buy new panels for the really bad areas.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm willing to do anything and everything I'm able to do on my own. But I'm only 16, and am kind of limited when it comes to tools. So I probably won't be able to go doing any welding or anything like that on my own.

As for sticking with the original components so the car is worth more... I plan to keep this car forever. It's got too much sentimental value to me. In fact, I'd like to pass it on to my son one day, and him do the same when he gets older.
 

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scftw said:
I'm willing to do anything and everything I'm able to do on my own. But I'm only 16, and am kind of limited when it comes to tools. So I probably won't be able to go doing any welding or anything like that on my own.

As for sticking with the original components so the car is worth more... I plan to keep this car forever. It's got too much sentimental value to me. In fact, I'd like to pass it on to my son one day, and him do the same when he gets older.
ya to me, the old cars are nice, but i like to have a modern stereo in my car, so in a classic you can hide it in the glove box or somethin ... i like the car to look like a restored classic, but still have all the extras, when we did our bug we just went straight stock for a 66, except for the old 6volt system was upgraded to a 12v so we didnt have to push start it half the time (and that was the ONLY reason we did it, my mom couldnt push start it and she liked driving it lol)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yeah, I'm probably going to make some changes to the car like that. It won't be completely classic. The only thing that will be restored completely back to its original state (with the exception of wheels/tires) is the exterior. I'm going to go bigger than the factory 13s or 14s or whatever they are. I want to repaint it the original red, and get all the chrome trim and whatnot for it, though.
 

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i'll bet money that car's engine is locked, the 425 in my oldsmobile was and it was sitting in indiana for roughly the same amount of time I have pretty much the same project going on right now except i have a 67 oldsmobile but the condition is about the same, the rust is where i'd focus right now.
 

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I took one look at the rusty rear quarters and said "better you than me".

You can't beat the rust monster. I've had it on way too many cars and while it's fixable, it's not fun fixing. And the Falcon is a unibody so it's not just a matter of rust on the outer panels, you have to make sure it's got solid floors, rocker panels, and transmission tunnel as that's where all the chassis strength comes from.

I bought my clunker MGB as a running driving car with decent mechanicals but a rusty body. Looking back, I wish I didn't have the desire to have a Brit roadster right now and instead got myself a rust-free body that needed work under the hood. It's relatively easy to fix or replace pieces to bolt onto the car compared to trying to patch the actual tin can itself and make sure it's still straight and strong.

Having just ruined your morning, I will wish you good luck with your project and hope you keep us updated. Unlike some others here, I don't think there's any huge demand for mostly stock Falcons so if it takes tossing a 351C under the hood to keep your interest and make it fun, rock on. The car's not going to have much of a resale value either way seeing what you've got to start with (no offense).
 

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scftw said:
Yeah, I'm probably going to make some changes to the car like that. It won't be completely classic. The only thing that will be restored completely back to its original state (with the exception of wheels/tires) is the exterior. I'm going to go bigger than the factory 13s or 14s or whatever they are. I want to repaint it the original red, and get all the chrome trim and whatnot for it, though.
If you're looking to save a few bucks, and you only want the rims to spiff up the appearance, you might look into getting a set of whitewalls. They look great on old cars, and you will only be paying for a set of tires, as opposed to a set of tires and a set of rims.

If you want the rims for performance, it's a different story. However, if you get bigger (and especially wider) rims, you will change the shape of the contact patch. Maybe good, depends what you are looking for.
 

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Thats a huge project car! You should check the frame and make sure its not rusted through in area's, if it is theres trouble. Getting rid of the rust will be one of your bigger important parts of this project. Good luck with it!

Being only 16 this is going to take awhile but I too have a project car and I plan on taking me years to complete it. Good luck man, update pics when you pick her up
 

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Discussion Starter #15
A lot of people have told me I should just go find a Falcon in better condition and restore it. But it's more the sentimental value of this car, rather than the car itself, that has me so determined to get it back on the road.

Claff, don't feel bad about ruining my morning (you didn't, really). I've known for quite a while that this wasn't going to be an easy project, and I've also known that the rust is going to be one of the toughest parts of it all.

About the rims.. I want them both for looks and performance. Like I said, this car is going to be a weekend cruiser and show car mainly, but I may feel the urge to get it on the track once in a while, too.

The next time I'll be in Indiana will probably be for Christmas, but I'm not sure. I'll get some interior pictures the next time I'm up there, or when I get it down here or something.
 

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Looks like a big project but I bet it will pay off in the end.

Personally I would paint that bad boy black with an cream stripe that flows down the side with the middle of the body.

After that I would go with a cream leather interior and get all the parts chrome again.

And put a shaker hood in that.

yearone.com carries good products.
 

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I understand the sentimental value thing, but when you're done you will have very little left of the original car. Just the rust I can see in the pics ids going to require you to replace the front fender, door skin, and rear fenders. And from that pic you cant even see the floor boards, trunk floor, frame, etc.

I totally understand when people say they want to keep X car for sentimental reasons, but really, how much of the original car will you be left with at the end? 10% 15%. I would say about that, especially after replacing the engine, and any other moving parts that are seized or rusted.

Good luck man. I wouldn't take that project on in a million years.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Yeah, I guess when you get technical, it won't be the original car anymore. But I'd still have the joy of being able to say, "I restored this completely rusted '62 Falcon to the showstopper you see before you today."

Plus, my goal isn't to keep all of the original parts or restore it to be resold. I want to take THIS car, and turn it into what I've dreamed about for the last 14 years.
 

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Malogus said:
I totally understand when people say they want to keep X car for sentimental reasons, but really, how much of the original car will you be left with at the end? 10% 15%. I would say about that, especially after replacing the engine, and any other moving parts that are seized or rusted.
Well, a car is more than just the sum of its parts. There's an essence to a car that isn't part of the engine, or the fenders, or the headliner. It's there independant of the rust, paint, oil and grit that may be on the car. If you replaced every single piece of machinery and every body part, you'd still have that essence. It would infuse any new part you add to the car, becoming part of the new piece just as a blood transfusion or a transplanted organ becomes a part of the person without destroying the person.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
AADA Driver said:
Well, a car is more than just the sum of its parts. There's an essence to a car that isn't part of the engine, or the fenders, or the headliner. It's there independant of the rust, paint, oil and grit that may be on the car. If you replaced every single piece of machinery and every body part, you'd still have that essence. It would infuse any new part you add to the car, becoming part of the new piece just as a blood transfusion or a transplanted organ becomes a part of the person without destroying the person.
That's what I was attempting to say. :3_bier:
 
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