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Does anyone know if anybody makes a big brake kit with front and rear upgrades. All of the ones I have seen only come with the front
 
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I think they are just the front, I was also curious I really wanna upgrade the back brakes... Is it possible to use the front brakes for the back then use the new big brake kit??
 

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it really isn't necesary to upgrade the back brakes on a tiburon, if you just want them to look nicer you could throw on some cross drilled or slotted roters, but you'll loose like 20% of your breaking power by doing so
 

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Yes there are kits that are made for the rear of our car. Rotora doesnt offer it. I was told it would have to be R&D'd for proper braking and I dont think they felt the car needed it.

I know I dont have lock up problems with my set up.

There is a wilwood set up that someone here made...but I cant remember who it was. Just use the search button.
 

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drew04GT said:
it really isn't necesary to upgrade the back brakes on a tiburon, if you just want them to look nicer you could throw on some cross drilled or slotted roters, but you'll loose like 20% of your breaking power by doing so
Huh, maybe im not understanding. Why would you lose breaking power by adding cross drilled and slotted to the rear. If anything i think it would help.
 

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Hurdler5280 said:
Huh, maybe im not understanding. Why would you lose breaking power by adding cross drilled and slotted to the rear. If anything i think it would help.
okay, here's the scoop on cross drilled / slotted rotors

first off, most people ( mainly people selling them, or people that don't know what they're talking about ) will attest to the "fact" that they help cool your breaks. this is a myth, and has been dispelled by basic physics. most people think the slots or holes help to move air through thuse cooling the breaks, this is just plain false and i won't bother getting into it because i doubt anyone here would argue any validity in the statement. the more common though is that they help to expell gas build up, this was true! however, nowadays most performance break pads have all but eliminated the problem of gas build up, and the rotors are basically useless. cross drilled / slotted rotors do have some advantages, but none that the average driver will benifit from. one example would be offroad/rally/dirt track drivers, the slotted rotors help clear the pads with every pass ( they also wear the pads much faster ) however, unless you plan on driving dirt tracks, that won't really help you out.

most people that purchase cross driller / slotted rotors for their tibs were either illinformed before purchasing, or simply purchased them for the "race" look. i'm not dissing them, i really don't care what kind of breaks you have, but they arn't going to give you any performance gains. infact, buy drilling or slotting your rotors you're actually decreasing the surface area of the rotor, thus decreasing your braking performance.

if you really want to upgrade your breaks, i would recomend getting your rotors resurfaced and grabbing some nice perfoamance pabs ( i use EBC greens, but hawk pads are great too and I think someone on here sells them )
 

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You know, I didn't even pay attention to the fact that you were talking about a BBK, I guess if you went up to larger rotors, although they were cross drilled / slotted you would probably still see better performance, then again, putting huge rotors on the back wouldn't really do much of anything
 

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You'd get "better performance" in the sense that the effective radius is greater. Not because it has a bunch of holes in it. And being bigger and beefier to begin with it would hold up better being less stressed for the given duty cycle. Still, they ain't for every application.
 

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I can't say I notice any difference in braking performance. But, aftermarket rotors are much cheaper then OEM and look much better.
 

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If you want to increase your brakeing ability might i suggest k-spec's 2 piston caliper for the front as an upgrade too?
 

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BBK are useless unless you do motorsport or motorcross. BBK help disapate heat thats about it. multiple pistons reduce pressure to one spot and which reduced heat of the brakefluid. bigger rotors reduce heat even more, and floating rotors reduces heat and increases cooling time and makes the brake system lighter. New break pads have reduced gas build up, but under several high speed stops brake fade still occurs

A good set of stainless steel braided breaklines and some good brake pads will improve your break performance.
 

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Hmm. Anyone referencing "breaks" probably shouldn't be speaking so sure of himself.

While it's true the greatest benefits of the BBK come when exposed to track day use they by no means useless on the street.

A proper, fixed mount caliper BBK offers the daily driver; improved pedal/caliper response, improved pedal feel, enhanced thermal capacity for 'spirited' use on occasion and the option to fit much higher quality track day pads if so desired.

Multi piston calipers spread the pressure points over the pad more evenly for better wear and less pad deflection under high load. There's no connection between piston qty and fluid temps at all.

Bigger rotors don't reduce heat, they simply manage it far better. It's efficiency is greatly improved.

Foating rotors are by no means lighter, they do nothing more for heat or temperature than a fixed mount rotor does. Floating rotors are produced to allow more even expansion when the rotor grows under severe duty. Being pin driven on the hat, the rotor is essentially lose fitting. A fixed mount hat bolted to the rotor is less effective in this manner. On the flip side they cost far less and don't rattle in time.

All pads have a gasous build up between the pad and rotor. It's a byproduct of friction. Pad fade can occur when this layer build up more and prevents the pad from biting the rotor. Or when the binding agents in the pad overheat and break down. Finging the right balance between bit, operating temp range, long life, noise and dust levels is the goal.

The BBK does much of the above thing like any brake system. Only it does it more effectively with less strain on the system. And frankly; a lot of people like them because they look better too.
 
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